Members

Prof. Dr. Martin Ziegler

  • Associate Professor
  • Email: ziegler [at] cs.kaist.ac.kr
  • Office: KAIST School of Computing, E3-1 #3406
  • Phone: +82-42-350-3568
  • Topics: Complexity and Real Computation

Dr. Svetlana Selivanova

  • Visiting Research Professor
  • Office: KAIST School of Computing, E3-1 #3409
  • Topic: Computational Complexity of Partial Differential Equations

Seulkina Kim

  • Email: kmkm23 [at] kaist.ac.kr
  • Office: KAIST School of Computing, E3-1 #3430
  • Phone: 042-350-7831

Sewon Park

  • Email: swelite [at] kaist.ac.kr
  • Office: KAIST School of Computing, E3-1 #3413
  • Topic: Semantics and Verification of Exact Real Computation

Ivan Koswara

  • Email: chaoticiak [at] kaist.ac.kr
  • Office: KAIST School of Computing, E3-1 #3413
  • Topic: Computational complexity of real polynomial/matrix/operator powering

Hyunwoo Lee

  • Email: lhw941 [at] kaist.ac.kr
  • Office: KAIST School of Computing, E3-1 #3413
  • Topic: Random Functions in Exact Real Computation

Donghyun Lim

  • Email: klimdhn [at] kaist.ac.kr
  • Office: KAIST School of Computing, E3-1 #3409
  • Topic: Coding Theory of Continuous Structures
  • 이승우
  • 안남조
  • Talipov Anuar
  • Nguyen Viet Dung

Youngjo Min

  • Undergraduate Student
  • Email: tuna10516 [at] kaist.ac.kr
  • Topic: Analytic Functions in Exact Real Computation

Seokbin Lee

  • Undergraduate Student
  • Email: seokbinlee [at] kaist.ac.kr
  • Topic: Grassmannian as Continuous Abstract Data Type

Seunghun Koh

  • Undergraduate Student
  • Email: shk0724 [at] kaist.ac.kr

Visitors

  • Prof. Dr. Dieter Spreen (Uni Siegen in Germany, 3 months in 2017 and 2018)
  • Prof. Dr.-math. Friedhelm Meyer auf der Heide (Uni Paderborn in Germany, 1 month, 2017)
  • Prof. Dr. Pieter Collins (Uni Maastricht in Netherlands, 1 month, 2017)
  • Prof. Dr. Michal Konečný (Aston University in UK, 1 month, 2017)
  • Apl. Prof. Dr. Norbert Müller (Uni Trier in Germany, 2 months in 2017 and 2019)
  • M. Sc. Eike Neumann (Aston University in UK, 2 months in 2017)
  • M. Sc. Holger Thies (Tokyo University, 1 month in 2017)
  • Dr. Svetlana Selivanova (Sobolev Institute of Mathematics in Russia, 1 week in 2017 before joining the lab)
  • Prof. Dr. Chee Yap (Courant Institute of Mathematical Science at New York University in U.S.A., 1 week in 2018)
  • Prof. Dr. Fritz Mayer-Lindenberg (Uni Hamburg-Harburg in Germany, 2 months in 2018 and 2019)
  • Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwichtenberg (LMU Munich in Germany, 2 months in 2018 and 2020)
  • Prof. Dr. Hajime Ishihara (JAIST, 1 month in 2018)
  • B.Sc. Christopher Fichtlsherer (Uni Hamburg in Germany, 1 month in 2018)
  • Dr. Gleb Pogudin (Courant Institute of Mathematical Science at New York University in U.S.A., 1 week in 2018)
  • M. Sc. Franz Brausse (Uni Trier in Germany, 1 month in 2019)
  • Dr. Sabrina Ouazzani (École Politechnique in France, 1 week in 2019)
  • Dr. Eike Neumann (Aston University in UK, 1month in 2019)
  • Open, direct, constructive communication
  • “There is nothing more practical than a good theory” (Kurt Lewin, 1952)
  • Science thinks ahead of Engineering acting
  • True innovation happens OUTside the currently popular trends/beaten tracks
  • Administration supports the academic system, not vice versa
  • Collaboration trumps competition: our adversary is ignorance, not colleagues
  • Be true to yourself and others: If you like pretending, better become an actor than a scientist.
  • “Remember your humanity, and forget the rest” (Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell, 1955)
  • Research should be fun: If you don't enjoy it, your advisor is doing a bad job :-)
  • Usain Bolt will never be fast ENOUGH: his coach will always push him to become even faster, FASTER. Similarly, your research will never be good ENOUGH.
  • Nevertheless, your value as person does not correlate with public recognition, fame, wealth.
  • The world is in grave danger: If mankind has a future, it will be based on collaboration, not competition.
  • For true innovation, and as Science is designated to research ahead of engineering and technology, FORGET all current and contemporary approaches! Instead, study the past classics and apply them to the future. Start by questioning what is considered “gospel” in your field.